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IPA One-Shot: Climate Change 2016

I entered the IPA One-Shot challenge in the fall of 2016 and promptly forgot occasionally remembering to check on the progress of the contest. Recently, after a google search of all things I found the results posted online. Despite accidentally entering my photograph of the crowds traveling up to the Athabasca Glacier in the professional category,  I received an honorable mention. Here's the Photograph below taken at the foot of the Athabasca Glacier in Jasper National Park.

Athabasca Glacier Crowds
Athabasca Glacier Crowds

           The equipment used in the taking of this photograph included one of my favorite 'accessories' a CPL or Circular Linear Polarizing filter. A CPL filters effectiveness, depends literally on the direction your facing in relation to the sun. A CPL filter can visibly darken bright sky's giving clouds additional definition. Its best to use a CPL filter facing away from the sun at right angles, however, one should be wary using such a filter because it can also introduce a dark band across the sky potentially ruining an image.

          If you've visited the Athabasca Glacier I'm sure you've noticed the signs marking the foot of the glacier and noticed its been receding by an average of 5 meters or 16 feet per year. At its current rate of shrinkage the Athabasca Glacier will disappear entirely in a generation.

Here's a few articles on the Athabasca Glacier:
Athabasca Glacier could disappear within generation, says manager - CBC

Rocky Mountains could lose 90 per cent of glaciers by 2100

IPA Winners and Honorable Mentions: One-Shot: Climate Change

Winners and Honorable Mentions

My Photograph on the IPA Website

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