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Nowhere is a new and continuing project of mine covering unmanaged wilderness far from any official paths. The photographs may originate on back country trails or just literally have been taken in the wilderness near nothing in particular, well nothing on a recognizable map at least. An unmanaged wilderness is one devoid of human interference, be it the felling of leaning trees or the clearing of fallen branches and undergrowth; a potential fire hazard during dry summers.

Another Day
Another Day

           The photograph above is of an unmanaged, second-growth coastal rain-forest seen from within. Before extensive logging in the early 20th century this landscape would have appeared entirely different. These dense narrow columns formed by Western Hemlock, occupy space, once taken by old growth cedar tree's some thousands of years old and meters across. Cedar is an interesting wood in that it resists both insect infestation and to some degree rot, as a result, many massive stumps still bearing the scars of 1930's logging operations can be found throughout the forests of British Columbia.


           The poplar in the right of the image appears to have been unable to compete with its coniferous neighbors. Despite being taken within minutes and a kilometer of the previous image, this photograph, taken facing the forest on the edge of a clearing looks different, for one it lacks the mist of low cloud cover seen in the prior image secondly its facing southwest towards the sun.

Near a Ravine
Near a Ravine

           Can you see the ravine's edge? The drop begins in the lower quarter of the photograph, notice the line as the moss and undergrowth ends and tree tops begin. This ravine drops roughly 35 feet to a rocky stream with a surprisingly strong current due to recent rainfall and melt water. Never underestimate the landscape you travel, for it may prove far more dangerous than any beast you fear to encounter. 

General Tips for Walking Outdoors 

           Pay attention, don't use headphones or earbuds when traveling alone in any wilderness and obviously don't travel alone in the wilderness. Avoid getting lost by sticking to marked trails or rely on an experienced guide, bring stuff like marking tape, food, water and if your in Pacific Northwest waterproof clothing.

           Camera equipment is fragile watch your step, use a camera strap and when your not taking pictures store your camera safely in a camera bag or preferably a backpack if your walking to avoid unbalancing yourself. In areas prone to unpredictable or rainy weather I recommend using weather sealed camera equipment if at all possible. If your purchasing your first DSLR or a second camera make finding a weather resistant or sealed model a priority especially if you're interested in outdoor and nature photography.


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