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I Walked

I walked is a series of photographs taken during late November highlighting the beauty and the unpredictable nature of weather in the coastal rain forests in British Columbia. The simple names of the series describe what I did as I was taking the photographs. I poke fun at the grandiose or descriptive names sometimes given to landscape photographs by choosing descriptive names such as "I looked right".

The dark 'moodiness' of this series is intentional, these photographs use compositions, lighting and environmental factors such as fog to convey a brooding and contemplative mood.

I don't recommend using tripods for day-lit, cluttered environments such as the forest such equipment can be burdensome to carry, ruin the spontaneity, creativity and may affect your composition. Don't simply focus on the act of taking a photograph when venturing out on a hike. Enjoy the sights, sounds and experience of being in the wilderness only then can you capture something worth…

PX3 Prix de la Photographie Paris - Silver

I entered a series of photographs I took in November 2016 that I call Six into PX3 in 2017, then just like in the case of my entry into the International Photo Awards One Shot 2016 promptly forgot. However, unlike in the case of the IPA One Shot Challenge I remembered to enter my series into the proper category, non professional, because I don't earn the majority of my income from my photography related pursuits. Remember, an amateur is defined as somebody who undertakes a given pursuit for the sake of personal fulfillment and enjoyment rather than economic considerations.

           I was delighted to discover recently that I had won silver in the nature - tree's category due to series being restricted to five images at PX3 I reduced my series to the following photographs. I described my series as follows: A carefully timed series of photographs taken during November 2016; all within 30 minutes of each other. This series exemplifies the transitional nature of the fall as well …

Fog, Cloud and Mountains

Fog blowing along mountain ridge lines in valleys creates a striking vista. Rather than merely obscure; the fog and billowing clouds highlight beautiful alpine features, from ragged tree lines along the peaks of low mountains, to seemingly near vertical forests inaccessible on steep slopes.

           Views such as that above come during the rains in mid to late fall and throughout spring in British Columbia reminding me of the humidity and delicate smell of fresh rainfall on a cool spring day. Interestingly, if you search enough you'll find theirs a word for almost anything including fresh rainfall which is petrichor originally coined by two Australian researchers. Here's a link to petrichor's definition by Merriam Webster. As discussed in Merriam Webster's definition of petrichlor, its incredible to find a single word that precisely describes something everyone around the world experiences yet struggles to describe in a sentence let alone one word.

           Its int…

Film Photography - Canon AE-1 and Kiev 4

I still occasionally shoot film, mostly black and white films such as Ilford HP5 plus and Ilford Delta 100. Here's a few of my favorite film photographs freshly developed and scanned this week. I'll include a detailed description and additional information the on the camera and settings used below each photograph.

           This is a piece of construction equipment, specifically used for laying pipes and other underground utilities. It was laying on the sidewalk near a lawn and looked rather interesting inside, the cables in the center of the frame are used to lift this massive piece of steel into a newly dug hole, reinforcing the sides and preventing the walls from collapsing onto the construction workers inside.

           I took this photograph using my trusty but erratic Kiev 4 a rangefinder camera that's origins lay in the former Soviet Union. The Kiev 4 is a licensed copy of the Contax III a pre-war German rangefinder camera the design, manufacturing equipment and e…


I have an entire album of photographs on Flickr comprised of interesting one off's. What differentiates these photographs  is their mystery and distinctiveness, every image tells a story and some stories remain pure mystery while others luckily have answers.

           I found this miniature scene while walking through the University of British Columbia's Malcolm Knapp Research Forest; if your interested in learning more about UBC's forest follow the hyperlink to its website. Somebody had placed what appeared to be wedding cake ornaments on various sites along a short but scenic trail, perhaps as part of a wedding photo-op. Mysteriously, these ornaments had been simply been forgotten, left behind after they were used in the photo-op or placed along the path for a reason we'll likely never find out.

           Some time ago it became trendy to mount old manual lenses built for the SLR's of the past on modern DSLR camera's. Many of the individuals who mount these…

IPA One-Shot: Climate Change 2016

I entered the IPA One-Shot challenge in the fall of 2016 and promptly forgot occasionally remembering to check on the progress of the contest. Recently, after a google search of all things I found the results posted online. Despite accidentally entering my photograph of the crowds traveling up to the Athabasca Glacier in the professional category,  I received an honorable mention. Here's the Photograph below taken at the foot of the Athabasca Glacier in Jasper National Park.

Athabasca Glacier Crowds
The equipment used in the taking of this photograph included one of my favorite 'accessories' a CPL or Circular Linear Polarizing filter. A CPL filters effectiveness, depends literally on the direction your facing in relation to the sun. A CPL filter can visibly darken bright sky's giving clouds additional definition. Its best to use a CPL filter facing away from the sun at right angles, however, one should be wary using such a filter because it can also introduce a dark band…

Film : Alive and Well in 2017

Black and white film is distinctive, it has a pronounced grain and a certain feel to it that can't be matched digitally. Perhaps, that's why companies such as Ilford and Kodak have continued manufacturing a wide variety of black and white films; in formats varying from the common 35mm cartridge to 120mm and even 8 by 10 inch sheet film. Interestingly, major film producing companies including Fujifilm, Kodak and Harman Technology-Ilford have been experiencing growth of 5% annually in film sales according to sources such as Time Magazine in 2017. This growth contrasts the media narrative of a slow decline and death of film among other analog formats like Vinyl Records (The Guardian) and even the venerable Cassette Tape (Forbes).

           Moreover, black and white films are increasingly available online internationally, from retailers such as B&H and even first and third party sellers on Ebay and Amazon. Interestingly, black and white film developers, stop bathes, fixers, cl…