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Different

I have an entire album of photographs on Flickr comprised of interesting one off's. What differentiates these photographs  is their mystery and distinctiveness, every image tells a story and some stories remain pure mystery while others luckily have answers.



           I found this miniature scene while walking through the University of British Columbia's Malcolm Knapp Research Forest; if your interested in learning more about UBC's forest follow the hyperlink to its website. Somebody had placed what appeared to be wedding cake ornaments on various sites along a short but scenic trail, perhaps as part of a wedding photo-op. Mysteriously, these ornaments had been simply been forgotten, left behind after they were used in the photo-op or placed along the path for a reason we'll likely never find out.



           Some time ago it became trendy to mount old manual lenses built for the SLR's of the past on modern DSLR camera's. Many of the individuals who mount these…

IPA One-Shot: Climate Change 2016

I entered the IPA One-Shot challenge in the fall of 2016 and promptly forgot occasionally remembering to check on the progress of the contest. Recently, after a google search of all things I found the results posted online. Despite accidentally entering my photograph of the crowds traveling up to the Athabasca Glacier in the professional category,  I received an honorable mention. Here's the Photograph below taken at the foot of the Athabasca Glacier in Jasper National Park.


Athabasca Glacier Crowds
The equipment used in the taking of this photograph included one of my favorite 'accessories' a CPL or Circular Linear Polarizing filter. A CPL filters effectiveness, depends literally on the direction your facing in relation to the sun. A CPL filter can visibly darken bright sky's giving clouds additional definition. Its best to use a CPL filter facing away from the sun at right angles, however, one should be wary using such a filter because it can also introduce a dark band…

Film : Alive and Well in 2017

Black and white film is distinctive, it has a pronounced grain and a certain feel to it that can't be matched digitally. Perhaps, that's why companies such as Ilford and Kodak have continued manufacturing a wide variety of black and white films; in formats varying from the common 35mm cartridge to 120mm and even 8 by 10 inch sheet film. Interestingly, major film producing companies including Fujifilm, Kodak and Harman Technology-Ilford have been experiencing growth of 5% annually in film sales according to sources such as Time Magazine in 2017. This growth contrasts the media narrative of a slow decline and death of film among other analog formats like Vinyl Records (The Guardian) and even the venerable Cassette Tape (Forbes).

           Moreover, black and white films are increasingly available online internationally, from retailers such as B&H and even first and third party sellers on Ebay and Amazon. Interestingly, black and white film developers, stop bathes, fixers, cl…

9,000 Words

If a picture is worth a thousand words, nine pictures are worth 9,000. But, what if these nine pictures were arranged differently, speaking not individually but as a collective with a temporal orderliness or a 'plot' to these images. Well then, rather than simply being a wall of descriptive text about 9 individual scenes these photographs would tell a story. Stories don't have to be complicated or confounding in any way, neither, do they have to be profound by making a statement about 'the human condition' all a story does and all it needs to do is tell a story. I'll leave you a small story below about people and scenes I discovered on a walk this past Sunday.


           I hope this has been interesting to view and overall something a little different. The location was Barnett Beach near Simon Fraser University and the note and tent a derelict beach-side shelter hidden by the edge of the woods. I never saw or met the shelters owner but it looks like he's an…

Kiev 4: Black and White Imagery

Recently I've run several rolls of film through a Kiev 4, a camera manufactured under licence in a former arsenal in Kiev Ukraine. I've scanned several of the resulting negatives and have been surprised with the results. The Kiev 4 is one quirky camera and the pictures my example has taken are best described as haunting. The spookiness of the photographs isn't helped by the fact that I chose to use black and film and develop it in Ilfosol3, which doesn't seem to have encouraged fine grain on the 400 ISO Kodak film.


Boundary

           Above, see the border of a wildlife conservation area near Pitt Lake in Pitt Meadows British Columbia. It was raining at the time and the clouds had entirely obscured the view of the nearby mountains in their characteristically moody manner. If you're wondering about the settings used to take these photographs I used an aperture of f/8 here for greater depth of field I metered using an analogue light meter, because unfortunately, light …

Nowhere

Nowhere is a new and continuing project of mine covering unmanaged wilderness far from any official paths. The photographs may originate on back country trails or just literally have been taken in the wilderness near nothing in particular, well nothing on a recognizable map at least. An unmanaged wilderness is one devoid of human interference, be it the felling of leaning trees or the clearing of fallen branches and undergrowth; a potential fire hazard during dry summers.


Another Day
           The photograph above is of an unmanaged, second-growth coastal rain-forest seen from within. Before extensive logging in the early 20th century this landscape would have appeared entirely different. These dense narrow columns formed by Western Hemlock, occupy space, once taken by old growth cedar tree's some thousands of years old and meters across. Cedar is an interesting wood in that it resists both insect infestation and to some degree rot, as a result, many massive stumps still bearing t…

Dusk

Dusk is transformational, fading light changes the impression of a landscape entirely. Colors fade, green slowly turns grey as perspective shifts and what was once the distance in a woodland view becomes fog then complete darkness. Dusks light is a fickle and delicate thing, overexposure leads to a loss of perspective, as the image looks as though it was taken in daylight, while contrast beyond a minuscule amount becomes the destroyer of subtle detail. Photographing at dusk is a pursuit of balance, expressing a scene and conveying detail and emotion while maintaining an atmosphere of realism, one that’s dusk. 


Frozen Forest
           Snow-light illuminated much of the foreground of this scene. The orderly yet chaotic atmosphere created by the lines of the Western Hemlock trees and the light of the clear cut in the background bring startling contrast and details to the scene. Notice the dead branches clinging to the straight trunks of the Hemlock's? These Hemlock trees grow densely …